East Surrey Reg

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Military art prints of the East Surrey Regiment by regimental artist Richard Simkin. Military art prints published by Cranston Fine Arts.

The East Surrey Regiment-Regimental District No.31-is composed of the 31st and 70th regiments.  The 31st were originally Marines, and were formed into a regiment of foot in 1715.  Their first important fighting was at Dettingen, where they gained the approbation of George II., and at the same time as a consequence the sobriquet of the young Buff’s, the king having mistaken them for the famous 3rd Regiment.  Fierce fighting, too, did they have at Fontenoy, where it is recorded, only eleven men of the grenadier company came out of action.  Four years later they served at Minorca, then, after a short sojourn at home, in Florida, and the Carib War in St. Vincent, where they did good service.  In 1776 they were quartered in Canada, some garrisoning Quebec, others participating in the misfortunes which attended General Burgoyne’s army at Saratoga.  In 1794 the flank companies served at Martinique, Guadaloupe and St. Lucia, and returned home in 1797, “reduced to a mere company.”  Soon after a 2nd battalion was formed, which obtained, for the East Surrey the Peninsular distinctions on their colours.

           They fought at Talavera; at Albuhera the 31st alone of the splendid regiments that charged against the advancing column of the enemy “being formed in column, stood their ground,” and escaped the disastrous onset of the French cavalry.  Yet their loss was very heavy, and-as had been recorded in connection with the “Die Hards,”-“at the close of the action the dead and wounded men of our gallant 31st and 57th Regiments were found lying in two distinct lines on the very ground they occupied when fighting.”  In his account of the action, Lord Wellesley wrote: “This little battalion alone held its ground against all the Colonnes en masse.”  The story of “Vittoria” and “The Pyrenees,” of “Nivelle” and the “Nive,” has before been told, and the 31st bear these names on their colours.  At St. Pierre they formed part of the right wing under General Byng, and the important part they played in that most brilliant victory may be gauged by the fact that when their gallant leader was elevated to the percentage as Earl of Stafford, the regimental colours of the regiment formed a portion of his coat-of-arms.  They fought at Orthes, and bear that name as well as the “Peninsula” on their colours.  Like many other 2nd battalions they were disbanded at the Peace, leaving a record of services of which any corps might be proud.  The 1st battalion meanwhile had been serving in Sicily, Egypt, Spain, Genoa, and various other places, all of them witnesses to the courage and discipline of the regiment, though the names of none of them are found amongst the distinctions.  In 1824 they were ordered to India under Colonel Pearson and Major McGregor, and wee on the ill-fated Kent East Indiaman when she foundered.  As the official record expresses it: “In the midst of dangers against which it seemed hopeless to struggle-at a time when no aid appeared, and passively to die was all that remained-each man displayed the manly resignation, the ready obedience, and the unfailing discipline characteristics of a good soldier.”  Fortunately the great majority were saved, only seventy-six out of a total of nearly five hundred being lost.  During their stay in India they took part in the Afghan and Sikh Wars, and were with Pollock’s avenging army after the massacre of Cabul.  They fought at moodkee; at Ferozeshah fell Major Baldwin of the regiment; at Ailwal they were remarked as being “emulous for the front;” “Sobraon” gives the final gleam to the lustre of their Indian achievements.  Then followed a period of comparative peace till, in May 1855, they arrived in the Crimea.  In this war they took part in the assaults on the Redan of the 18th of June and 8th of September, and bare “Sevastopol” in commemoration of their gallant conduct.  After peace was declared they were dispatched to the Cape and in 1858 to Bombay, their next service of note being the China Campaign of 1860.  Here they were in the First Division, and after the fall of the Taku Forts marched to Tientsin, detachments being subsequently stationed at Ho-see-woo and Yung-tsan to keep the road clear between that city and our camp.  The regiment returned home in 1863, since which date they have not been engaged in any operations, which call for notice.

           The 70th-the 2nd battalion of the East Surrey Regiment-was formed in 1756 from the 2nd battalion of the 31st, so that the recent amalgamation has replaced it in its original position.  Colonel Archer cites the fact that a few years after the incorporation of the regiment, “five companies were embarked on board a naval squadron as reinforcements for Madras, but nothing more is known of them.”  In 1764 the 70th were ordered to the West Indies, where they remained for some ten years, subsequently serving for four years in Canada, during which time they received the territorial designation of “The Surrey Regiment.”  To anticipate for a moment the order of events, we find that in 1812 they were officially styled the “Glasgow Lowland Regiment,” but during a subsequent sojourn in Canada-namely in 1825-they received their original and present title again.  In 1794 they took part in Sir Charles Grey’s expedition in Martinique, and during the operations connected therewith gained the distinction of “Guadaloupe.”  For many years following their sphere of duty lay mainly amongst our various colonies and possessions, chiefly in Canada.  In 1848 the 70th were ordered to India, and during the mutiny were engaged on the Pewhawar frontier.  In 1863 they were with Sir Duncan Cameron in New Zealand, and took part in the attack on the Gate Pah, the evacuation of which by the Maories was discovered by Major Greaves of the regiment, who, regardless of the possible fatal result to himself, made a reconnaissance of the position.  Returning to England in 1866, they remained on this country for some five years in 1871 being again ordered to India.  In the Afghan campaign of 1878-79 the 70th were in the Candahar column, and afterwards served with the Thull Field Force.  Their last active service was in the Egyptian campaign of 1884, during which they acquitted themselves with great credit, under General Graham, in the fighting which took place round Suakin, Hasheen, and Tamaa.        Excerpt from Her Majesty's Army By Walter Richards

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East Surrey Regiment by Harry Payne.


East Surrey Regiment by Harry Payne.



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Item Code : UN0049East Surrey Regiment by Harry Payne. - Editions Available
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PRINTOpen edition print.
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Image size 7 inches x 12 inches (18cm x 31cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!14.00

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The East Surrey Regiment by Richard Simkin


The East Surrey Regiment by Richard Simkin



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Item Code : UN0274The East Surrey Regiment by Richard Simkin - Editions Available
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PRINT Open edition print.
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Image size 9 inches x 12 inches (23cm x 31cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!14.00

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ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithograph, published c.1888.
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Image size 10 inches x 13 inches (25cm x 33cm)none140.00

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Private J. E. Healey Narrowly Escapes With His Life While Acting As A Messenger.


Private J. E. Healey Narrowly Escapes With His Life While Acting As A Messenger.

At Richebourg on October 28th 1914, Private James Edward Healey, of the 1st Battalion, East Surrey Regiment, was sent with an urgent message for reinforcements. His way lay along an open road, and he had gone about 100 yards when there was a blinding flash, and a shell exploded just in front of him. He was blown back twenty yards into a ditch by side of the road. With great pluck he got up to continue his journey, but he had hardly restarted when he was ht by a machine gun bullet. He continued on his way, however, and delivered his message at Headquarters. He had carried many messages under heavy fire, and for his conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty was awarded the D.C.M.
Item Code : DTE0883Private J. E. Healey Narrowly Escapes With His Life While Acting As A Messenger. - Editions Available
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PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.
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Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!13.00

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Sergeant Packard Checking The Enemys Attack With A Machine Gun At Richebourg LAvoue.


Sergeant Packard Checking The Enemys Attack With A Machine Gun At Richebourg LAvoue.

On advancing to attack the British trenches at Richebourg LAvoue, the Germans threw themselves flat on the ground when about eighty yards distant. With the help of a private, Sergeant Packard (East Surreys) took a machine gun over the parapet of his trench and along a ditch running at right angles to and between the opposing lines. When almost opposite the prostrate Germans, he mounted the machine gun and began firing. Before long some of the enemy appeared in the ditch, and as they crept close up to him. Packard turned the machine gun on them and they were soon wiped out. Swinging round he face the men lying in the open, and the moment they rose to attack, he directed a deadly fire on them. The Germans fell back in disorder, leaving the ground heaped with their dead and wounded. The conspicuous gallantry of Sergeant Packard was rewarded with the D.C.M.
Item Code : DTE0199Sergeant Packard Checking The Enemys Attack With A Machine Gun At Richebourg LAvoue. - Editions Available
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PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.
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Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!13.00

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History of the East Surrey Regiment 1917 - 1919 Volumes II and III by Colonel H W Pearse, DSO and Brigadier General H S Sloman, CMG, DSO.


History of the East Surrey Regiment 1917 - 1919 Volumes II and III by Colonel H W Pearse, DSO and Brigadier General H S Sloman, CMG, DSO.

These two volumes cover the history of the East Surrey Regiment throughout the Great War. In August 1914 the East Surreys comprised two Regular (1st and 2nd), one Reserve (3rd), one Extra Reserve (4th) and two Territorial battalions (5th and 6th); the Regimental Depot was at Kingston-on-Thames. As the war went on further battalions were added: eight so-called Service battalions (7th to 14th) in Kitcheners New Armies and a second and a third line battalion for each of the Territorial battalions for a total of eighteen battalions of which only nine saw active service overseas, and it is their war record which is the subject of this history. Each volume is divided into sections dealing with different periods, such periods being so defined as to bring out the successive phases of the war on the Western Front or in other theatres, and the successive chapters in each section deal with each battalion in the order of its seniority. Volume II, which has three sectins, contains the records, up .........


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Item Code : NMP8120History of the East Surrey Regiment 1917 - 1919 Volumes II and III by Colonel H W Pearse, DSO and Brigadier General H S Sloman, CMG, DSO. - Editions Available
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BOOKTwo volume paperback books.
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262 and 302 pages.none32.00

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