Prince of Wales' Own

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Prince of Wales' Own Regiment of Yorkshire shown in military art prints and military uniform prints of the West Yorkshire Regiment (Prince of Wales' Own) and the East Yorkshire Regiment ( Duke of York's).

The East Yorkshire Regiment     The East Yorkshire Regiment- Regimental District No.15- consists of the old fifteenth Foot.  The 15th dates from 1685, in which year they were raised in Nottinghamshire by Colonel Tufton, who was one of the officers that remained loyal to King James, and was accordingly superseded at the Revolution.  After serving for some time in Scotland the 15th went to Holland, and in 1695 fought with credit at Kenoque and Dixmunde.  They were engaged at Kaiserwerth and Nimeguen, at Venloo and Ruremonde, at Liege and Schellenberg.  In 1704 they fought at Blenheim, being in Rowe’s famous brigade, and commanded by Lieutenant-colonel Britton.  It was an occasion to try to the uttermost the morale of the British troops.  The position was critical, and rumours that a tremendous battle was inevitable had spread through the allied host.  Sir Edward Creasy has, pithily put the absolute necessity for the battle of Blenheim to be fought, when and how it was.  “Although the French army of Italy had been unable to penetrate in Austria, and although the masterly strategy of Marlborough had hitherto warded off the destruction, with which the allies seemed menaced at the beginning of the campaign; the peril was still most serious.  It was absolutely necessary for Marlborough to attack the enemy before Villeroy should be roused into action.  There was nothing to prevent that General and his army from marching into Franconia, whence the allies drew their principal supplies; and besides thus distressing them, he might by marching on and join his army to those of Tallard and the Elector, from a mass, which would over whelm the force under Marlborough and Eugene.  On the other hand, the chances of a battle seemed perilous, and the fatal consequences of a defeat were certain.  The consequence of a defeat of the confederated army must have broken up the Grand Alliance, and realised the proudest hopes of the French King.  Marlborough’s words, at the council of war when the battle was resolved on, to the officers who remonstrated with him on the seeming temerity of attacking the enemy in their position, were remarkable.  ‘I know the danger, yet a battle is absolutely necessary; and I rely on the bravery and discipline of our troops, which will make amends for our disadvantages.’”

           A writer quotes a curious incident relating to the regiment from an old book called “Advice to Officers.”  The 15th-then known as Howe’s Regiment-were attacking the village of Blenheim, when the major-who on account of too great strictness was unpopular-addressed his men, confessing, “that he had been to blame, and begged to fall by the hands of the French-not theirs.”  “March on, sir!” replied a grenadier.  “The enemy is before us, and we have something else to do than think of you just know!”  When the French gave way the officer waved his hat in his enthusiasm, exclaiming “Hurrah” gentlemen, the day is our own!”  As he was saying the words he fell dead, shot through the brain.  It would appear from the manner of recounting the incident, coupled with the significant title of the work in which it appears, that it was doubtful whether that fatal shot came from the front or the rear.  The regiment suffered heavily that day, as they did at Ramillies and Oudenarde.  They fought at Tornay in 1709, perhaps one of the most desperate sieges, from the point of view of individual suffering, of the many undertaken during this long war.  Some estimate of the difficulties our troops had to contend with may be gathered from the following: - “The citadel of Tournay was situated on some high ground, with a gentle ascent from the town, and the siege proved a service of the most difficult character, arising from the multiplicity of the subterranean works which were more numerous than those above the ground.  Sinking pits several fathoms deep, and working from carried on the approaches thence underground, until the troops arrived at the casemates and mines.  The soldiers engaged in these services frequently encountered parties of the enemy, and numerous combats occurred in these gloomy labyrinths.  On some occasions the men at work under ground were inundated with water; at other times suffocated with smoke, or buried by the explosion of mines.”           At the conclusive combat at Malplaquet the 15th were in the reserve, losing only one officer.  In the various battles and skirmishes which followed they were well to the fore, returning home in 1714.  In 1719 they fought at Glenshiel, following General Wightman in his skilful movement into the then almost inaccessible mountains, and showing their firm courage in combating and repulsing the brave McKenzie and McGregor’s.  They were attacked in rear and flank, but gallantly held their own, though they lost Captain Downes and two subalterns.

           After this they enjoyed a period of inaction for some twenty years or more, their next important service being at Carthagena in 1741.  The same old book before referred to (“Advice to Officers”) relates that the troops were very much annoyed during the night by continued reports from the outpost officer that a large body of Spaniards was approaching.  No attack or demonstration was, however, made, and at last an aide-de-camp was sent to the front to ascertain the cause of the reports.  There, sure enough, he saw what appeared to be a body of soldiers in the white uniform of the Spaniards, which now and again appeared and disappeared in the most perplexing fashion.  A nearer investigation explained the mystery.  Some white barked trees (the manchineel trees) had been cut down by the enemy to the height of five feet, and their tops burned, thus giving them black hats to their white clothes.  Added to this the sky was full of flying clouds which darkened the moon.  In 1746 the 15th fought at Quiberon and l’Orient, and eleven years later took part in the expeditions against the French coast.  In 1758 they were with General Amherst in the attack on Louisburg, and shared in that successful and not costly victory, though the loss to the 15th was somewhat severe.  In 1759 we find them at Quebec, in the brigade of General Monckton.  Very familiar amongst the household words of our military annals is the name Quebec.  There is probably not an Englishmen who does not regard it as one of the brightest flowers in the country’s Honour Wreath: there is, probably, not one in a hundred who realizes to any degree the difficulty and importance of the action.  “The position was an extremely strong one,” says a competent writer; “the main force was encamped on the high ground below Quebec, with their right resting on the St. Charles River, and the left on the Montmorency, a distance of between seven and eight miles.  The front was covered by steep ground, which rose nearly from the edge of the river, and the guns of the citadel of Quebec covered the right.

           A boom of logs chained together was laid across the mouth of the St. Charles, which was further guarded by two hulks, mounted with cannon.  A bridge of boats, crossing the river a mile higher up, connected the city with the camp.  All the gates of Quebec accept that of St. Charles, which faced the bridge were closed and barricaded.  A hundred and six cannon were mounted on the walls, while a floating-battery of twelve heavy pieces, a number of gunboats, and eight fire ships, formed the river defences.  The frigates, which had convoyed the merchant fleet, were taken higher up the river, and a thousand of their seamen came down from Quebec to man the batteries and gunboats.  Against the force of sixteen thousand men, posted behind defensive works, on a position almost impregnable by nature, General Wolfe was brining less than nine thousand troops.  The steep and lofty heights that lined the river rendered the cannon of the ships useless to him, and the exigencies of the fleet in such narrow and difficult navigation prevented the sailors being landed to assist the troops.”  The 15th captured Point Levi, and were amongst the first troops that gained the memorable heights of Abraham, greatly distinguishing them in the famous battle that followed.  The regiment remained in Quebec, defending it against the subsequent attacks, and in 1762 went to Martinique, where and at the Havana they maintained their high reputation.  

           Returning to England in 1768, a few years later they were ordered to America, and took part in the most of the battles during the War of Independence, including Charlestown, Long Island, Brooklyn, and Brandywine.  In 1782, the year that they received their title, they experienced some sharp fighting at St. Christoval, in St. Lucia, and twelve years later took part in the still more important operations in the same neighbourhood.  Under Sir Charles Grey they fought at Martinique, and led by Major Lyon and Captain Paumier, greatly distinguished themselves at the storming of Mount Mathurine.  At Guadeloupe, where they were again hotly engaged, they had two officers and several privates killed.  After a short stay at home they were ordered to Barbados in 1805, and for some time served as marines.  In 1809 they took part in the successful operations under General Beckwith in Martinique, and the following year three hundred of the regiment served under Colonel Riall, who was commanding our forces at Guadeloupe, again taking part five years later in the summary action rendered necessary by the adherence of Linois and Boyer to the cause of Napoleon.  After a few years spent at Bermuda and Canada the regiment returned home in 1821, and during the following years were occupied in quelling the Irish disturbances of 1826 and the more formidable movements in Canada in 1832 and at the commencement of Her Majesty’s reign.  They were next ordered to Ceylon, where the ever-recurring Candyan difficulties gave them some work to do, and the next important operation in which they were concerned was the Afghan War of 1879-80, where the second battalion represented them.           “The second battalion of the 15th regiment,” says Shadbolt, “formed part of the Reserve Division, southern Afghaninstan Field Force, which during the early part of March, 1880, was concentrated at Karachi, Suid.  After the receipt of the news of the disaster at Maiwand, the headquarters, eight companies left Karachi on the 4th August for Sibi, and marching through the Bolan Pass in detachments, with inadequate transport, with insufficient water, and in burning heat, arrived at Quetta on the 29th of the month.  Notwithstanding the great hardship they endured, his men worked with admirable spirit.  The trying nature of the march is attested by the fact that some one hundred of them, chiefly young soldiers who had been recently sent out, were placed hors de combat by sunstroke, heat apoplexy before reaching the Afghan frontier.”  The 15th advanced with Phayre’s Division through the Khojak Pass, but arrived too late to participate in the battle of Kandahar, and returned to India the following December.  Since that date they have been quartered in North America, Bermuda, and Gibraltar, but have not been engaged in any warlike service.    Her Majesty’s Army By Walter Richards

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Prince of Wales Own Regiment of Yorkshire by Douglas Anderson


Prince of Wales Own Regiment of Yorkshire by Douglas Anderson



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The Prince of Wales (West Yorkshire) Regiment by Harry Payne.


The Prince of Wales (West Yorkshire) Regiment by Harry Payne.



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Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment (14th foot) by Richard Simkin.


Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment (14th foot) by Richard Simkin.

Printed on high quality 300gsm German etching stock. Only 25 copies of this superb quality reprint are available.
Item Code : AU0053Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment (14th foot) by Richard Simkin. - Editions Available
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Sergeant W. H. Barclays Perilous Journey To His Trench With A Severely Wounded Man On His Back.


Sergeant W. H. Barclays Perilous Journey To His Trench With A Severely Wounded Man On His Back.

On the morning of October 19th 1914, Sergeant W. H. Barclay, of the East Yorkshire Regiment, crawled out from his trench, near Armentieres, to tap a German listening wire. He took with him Privates Thrussell, Donkin and Donnelly, and when the enemy opened fire on them, Thrussel was severely wounded. But Sergeant Barclay had him placed on his back, and then crawled with him to his trench, being shelled all the way. For his conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty on this occasion and also between September 25th and October 15th, Sergeant Barchy was awarded the D.C.M.
Item Code : DTE0868Sergeant W. H. Barclays Perilous Journey To His Trench With A Severely Wounded Man On His Back. - Editions Available
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PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.
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Corporal Meekosha, assisted by Privates Johnson, Sayers and Wilkinson, digging out men who had been buried in their trench by shellfire.


Corporal Meekosha, assisted by Privates Johnson, Sayers and Wilkinson, digging out men who had been buried in their trench by shellfire.

On November 19th 1915, Corporal Samuel Meekosha, of the 1/6th Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment (Territorial force) was with a platoon of about twenty non commissioned officers and men, who were holding an isolated trench near the Yser. During a very heavy bombardment by the been either killed or wounded, Corporal Meekosha at once took command and sent a runner for assistance. No less than ten more big shells fell within twenty yards of him, but with the assistance of Privates Johnson, Sayers and Wilkinson, of the battalion, who most stoutly assisted him throughout, he continued to dig out the buried men in full view of the enemy. At last four men were saved and for his most conspicuous bravery Corporal Meekosha was awarded the V.C. while Privateers Johnson, Sayers and Wilkinson received the D.C.M.
Item Code : DTE0519Corporal Meekosha, assisted by Privates Johnson, Sayers and Wilkinson, digging out men who had been buried in their trench by shellfire. - Editions Available
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East Yorkshire Regiment (15th foot) by Richard Simkin


East Yorkshire Regiment (15th foot) by Richard Simkin



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Item Code : UN0314East Yorkshire Regiment (15th foot) by Richard Simkin - Editions Available
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Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment by Richard Caton Woodville (P)


Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment by Richard Caton Woodville (P)



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Item Code : UN0474Prince of Wales Own West Yorkshire Regiment by Richard Caton Woodville (P) - Editions Available
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East Yorkshire Regiment by Richard Caton Woodville (P)


East Yorkshire Regiment by Richard Caton Woodville (P)



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The 15th East Yorkshire by Frank Feller (P)


The 15th East Yorkshire by Frank Feller (P)



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Item Code : UN0488The 15th East Yorkshire by Frank Feller (P) - Editions Available
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Historical Records of the 14th Regiment Now the Prince of Wales Own (West Yorkshire Regiment) From its Formation in 1689 to 1892 by Capt H ODonnell.


Historical Records of the 14th Regiment Now the Prince of Wales Own (West Yorkshire Regiment) From its Formation in 1689 to 1892 by Capt H ODonnell.

Despite the title the West Yorks came into existence in June 1685 at the time of the Monmouth Rebellion and, as then was the practice, was known after the man who raised it, Sir Edward Hales. Of immediate interest is the establishment of the regiment as at January 1686 showing the rates of pay for each rank and the numbers authorised, and the Regimental Roll of officers in 1687, the earliest roll that can be found. Hales unfortunately picked the wrong side in 1688 by supporting James II against William of Orange and ended up in the Tower; he was replaced by William Beveridge, appointed by the Prince of Orange who, in February 1689 was crowned William III with his consort Queen Mary. In 1692 the regiment went on active service for the first time, joining the army in Flanders where it gained its first battle honour - Namur 1695. In 1751 with the introduction of the system of foot numbers the regiment became the 14th Regiment of Foot. and a few years later, in 1764, King George III direc.........


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 The Princess Of Wales Own Yorkshire Regiment    The Princess of Wales Own Yorkshire Regiment-Regimental district No.19-consists of the old 19th Foot.  Though so few names appear on the colours the 19th is a regiment possessing a notable and long record of varied services well performed.  Rose in 1688 from the hands of pike men assembled in Devonshire to assist the cause of William of Orange, they were sent four years later to Flanders, and fought at Steenkirk, though without loss.  The following year they were at Landen, and were subsequently engaged in covering the siege of Namur.  In 1702 they took part in the operations against Cadiz, leaving Europe shortly after for the West Indies.  In 1710 we find them again in Flanders, where they fought at Douay and Bethune, and at Malplaquet, “the bloodiest action in the whole war.”  From 1714 they enjoyed a period of home duty for thirty years, repairing again to Flanders in 1745, when they took part in the battle of Fontenoy, and suffered severe loss there.  Seldom, indeed, has an army in which the British were so strongly represented, sustained such a defeat.  “Still, however, Cumberland, with his brave British and Hanoverian troops, preserved in his attack on the left, leaving the cavalry in the rear, and dragging some pieces of artillery with their own muscular arms; the foot crossed a ravine, and advanced full in front of the wood, the batteries and the abattis, and of the best part of the enemy’s army, for Saxe had been allowed time and opportunity to gather strength from his right wing.  The combat soon became close, and was terrific; our men were killed in heaps by the enemy’s artillery, but still they went closer, sweeping away the French foot and the sturdy Swiss guards, and giving back death for death.  From the necessity of the ground they now occupied, which was hollow and narrow, the British and Hanoverian foot were huddled together in compact masses.  Saxe, by the advice of the Duke of Richelieu, brought four pieces of heavy artillery to play upon them in this condition; and while the cannon roared and inflicted death in the front, they were attacked in flank by fresh troops, both foot and horse.  The Duke of Cumberland was the last in the retreat; he called upon his men to remember Blenheim and Ramillies.  If the English soldiers had had their will and no enemy in their rear, it might have been difficult to prevent, that evening, a new kind of combat, for their fury against the Dutch amounted almost to madness.”  A highland officer (Culloden Papers) wrote: “The action will, I believe, be found to be the bloodiest as to officers that has happened to the British in the memory of man.  The Hanoverians behaved most gallantly and bravely, and had the Dutch taken example from them, we had supped that night in Tournay.”  They fought at Val and Roncoux; in 1761-as the Duke of St. Albans, or Beauclerc’s Foot-they formed part of the force of ten thousand men under General Studholm Hodgson, destined for the capture of Belle Isle, in Brittany.  “The citadel of Palais, the capital of the isle, is a strong fortification fronting the sea, composed principally of a horn work, and is provided with two dry ditches, the one next the counterscarp, and the other so contrived as to secure the inner fortifications.  This citadel is divided from the largest part of the town by an inlet of the sea, over which thee is a bridge of communication.  From the other part of the town, that which is most inhabited, it is only divided by its own fortifications and a glacis, which projects into a place called the Esplanade, where the reservoir is kept.  Though there is a fine convenience for having wet ditches, yet round the town there is only a dry one, and some fortifications which cannot in many places be esteemed of the strongest kind; indeed, the low country which lies to the southward can easily be laid under water.”  Taking advantage of the fact that the steep and formidable nature of the approaches on one side rendered the enemy careless at these points, the Grenadier Company of the 19th, under captain Paterson, clambered up them, “and were in full possession of the rocks before the French were aware of the circumstances.”  Here they held their ground in a fierce contest with superior numbers, in which Captain Paterson lost and arm, and subsequent reinforcements enabled them to drive the French back.  “In this affair a private, named Samuel Johnson, displayed remarkable bravery.  On perceiving a subaltern of his regiment, to whom he felt grateful for some act of past kindness, overpowered by numbers, and about to be bayoneted by a French Grenadier, he rushed to his assistance and rescued him, killing no fewer than six of his assailants.”  The regiment spent several years at home and at Gibraltar, and in 1794 shared in the skirmishes and sufferings endured by our army in Holland.  In May 1794, Pichegru, who had continued to outwit the Austrians, swooped down with about fifty thousand men upon the British camp at Tournay.  The Duke of York’s army numbered, perhaps, thirty thousand, of whom, fortunately, only a small proportion was Dutch.  “But though flushed with success, the French were repulsed in every attack they made, and compelled to retreat from a field which they left covered with their dead.  The celerity of their movements and the superiority of their numbers were of no avail against the steadiness and determination of the duke’s troops.  The latter were occasionally brought to fight when they ought not to have fought at all, but whether attacking or attacked, the British troops invariably proved their pluck and stamina.”           “There was staunchness, there was heroism of the highest order in this fighting on the part of the troops who had previously experienced every possible disaster; and after this there was a glorious fortitude in the manner in which they withstood cold and hunger, and the fierce war of the elements, and in the midst of an unceasing hurricane of wind, snow, and sleet.  Many of the sick and wounded carried in open wagons were frozen to death, or perished of want, but not a living man in the army spoke of a halt or of a surrender.”

           In 1796 they were ordered to Ceylon, and in 1799 five companies took part in the important battle of Seringapatam.  For many years after that their duties were in Ceylon, where the frequent risings of the Candyans afforded them plenty of active and dangerous service.  In 1803 many of the officers and men were massacred in a rebellion of formidable proportions, and peace was not restored without some sharp fighting, of which the 19th bore the brunt.  The Mauritius, the Ionian Islands, Corfu, North America, with a brief sojourn in England, occupied the attention of the regiment till the Crimean War, when the opportunity offered for them to add three famous names to their colours.  They were in the Light division under Sir George Brown; and at the alma shared, with the Welsh Fusiliers and Connaught Rangers, the glory of that magnificent charge up-hill, during which, from rock and boulder, from thicket and vine-trellis, poured a devastating hail of Russian bullets.  “The 19th, with the Grenadiers and the Fusiliers, the 95th, the 30th, and the 47th Regiments, pressed eagerly forward with the regularity and firmness of troops and parade.  Just beyond the battery the heads of a strong body of Russians were visible, and these at last formed and charged down the hill in a compact mass upon the British troops toiling up the steep in face of the dreadful fire that was doing such execution into the ranks.  Some guns that had been brought up by the English artillery, with much difficulty, now opened upon this Russian column, and, so true was the aim, that at every discharge a clear passage was made through the serried mass.  The well-executed manoeuvre decided the day, the Russians turned, broke, and fled over the hill.”

           In this trying and painful ascent the indomitable valour of our men-many of them in action for the first time in their lives-was fully displayed.  Exposed to a continual roar of artillery, without being able for some time to return the fire, they kept on their course undaunted.           The men never quailed nor paused in their toilsome and perilous march.  After the retreat of this formidable battalion of the enemy the battle was speedily won.           They fought like heroes at Inkerman, where confusion seemed to multiply the terrors of the strife.  As the 19th with the rest of the Light Division pressed onward the scene was intensely bewildering.  One thing was only terrible distinct in its doings: the grim death, which was so busy that drear November day.  From the valley where seethed the battle in fullest fury rose a defending din-boom of cannon, rattle of muskets, the clang of steel, the hoarse word of command, the hoarser cries of fighting men, shout of triumph, and groans of pain.  Men fell fast, yet oftentimes no foe was visible-only the lurid flash gleaming from the dense thicket, and the white smoke drifting hither and thither on the blood-laden breeze.

           At the Quarries and the Redan they vied with the bravest.  “One of the most heroic episodes at the last assault was connected with a mere youth, named Massey, a lieutenant in the 19th Regiment, who kept out in the open in the hope of inducing the soldiers to follow; and there, amidst the most dreadful fire, he stood with a reckless courage that excited the astonishment even of the enemy.  He was dreadfully wounded, but won the sobriquet of ‘Redan Massey.’”  On the termination of the war he returned to the University of Dublin, exchanging “feats of broil and battle” for the “still air of delightful studies,” though even to the retirement of the academic walls his fame had preceded him; his fellow-students feted and be lauded him, as well they might; and men who passed him in the street stopped to point, with enthusiastic admiration, at the young hero of the Redan.     Amongst other individual instances of bravery the men of the 19th may be mentioned that of Private john Lyons, who on one occasion took up a live shell that had fallen amongst our men, carried it to the edge of the parapet and hurled it over the trenches.  Again, there was Private Samuel Evans, who, seeing, on the 13th of April, a Sapper engaged singly in repairing an embrasure under a heavy fire, went with Private Callaghan to his assistance, and completed the work.   The 19th arrived in India at the end of the mutiny, and for years were engaged in the numerous tribal disturbances, which threatened the peace of the empire.  After a short sojourn at Bermuda and in Canada they took part in the last phase of the war in the Sudan, “being employed of the line of communications during the Nile campaign of 1884-5 and in the subsequent operations on the Sudan frontier including the battle of Giniss.”     

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