The Black Watch

Home ] British Battles ] Special Air Service ] The Life Guards ] History of the Life Guards ] 1st Life Guards ] 2nd Life Guards ] Blues and Royals ] Royal Horse Guards ] Royal Dragoons ] Dragoon Regiments ] Queens Dragoons ] 4th / 7th Royal Dragoons ] 5th Royal Inniskillings ] Scots Dragoon Guards ] Hussar Regiments ] Royal Irish Hussars ] Queens Hussars ] 15th/19th Hussars ] 14th/20th Hussars ] Royal Hussars ] 13th/18th Hussars ] Lancer Regiments ] 9th/12th Lancers ] 16th / 5th Lancers ] 17th/21st Lancers ] Royal Artillery ] NATO Artillery ] Gulf War ] Napoleonic Artillery ] Artillery, WW2 ] Crimean War Artillery ] Royal Field Artillery ] Royal Garrison Artillery ] Royal Horse Artillery ] RHA Great War ] RHA Boer War ] RHA Napoleonic ] Parachute Regiment ] Royal Engineers ] Guard Regiments ] Grenadier Guards ] Coldstream Guards ] Scots Guards ] Irish Guards ] Welsh Guards ] R.Regiment of Wales ] Corp of Signals ] Army Medical Corps ] Transport Corps ] Pioneer Corps ] Army Catering Corps ] Army Corps ] Irish Regiments ] Royal Irish Rangers ] Royal Irish Regiment ] Connought Rangers ] Dublin Fusiliers ] Royal Irish Rifles ] Royal Munster Fusiliers ] Scottish Regiments ] The Royal Scots ] Argyll and Sutherland ] [ The Black Watch ] Queens Own Cameron ] Cameron Highlanders ] Seaforth Highlanders ] Gordon Highlanders ] Cameronians ] Highland Fusiliers ] Kings Own Borderers ] Infantry Regiments ] Devonshire and Dorset ] Princess of Wales R Reg ] Staffordshire Regiment ] Duke of Edinburgh's ] King's Regiment ] Royal Anglian Reg ] Cheshire Regiment ] Queen's Lancashire Reg ] Worcs and Sherwood ] Yorks and Lancs ] Royal Border Regiment ] Warwickshire Regiment ] West Riding ] Prince of Wales' Own ] Royal Green Jackets ] The Light Infantry ] Somerset Light Infantry ] Duke of Cornwalls ] King's own Yorkshire ] King's Shropshire L/ Inf ] Durham Light Infantry ] Yorkshire Light Infantry ] Fusilier Regiments ] Regiment of Fusiliers ] Lancashire Fusiliers ] Welch Fusiliers ] Northumberland Fusiliers ] Army Air Corp ] Royal Tank Reg ] Gurkha Rifles ] Yeomanry/Territorial ] Northern Ireland ] Commonwealth ] Canadian Armed Forces ] New Zealand ] Indian Army ] Military Gifts ]


Order Enquiries (UK) : 01436 820269

You currently have no items in your basket


Buy with confidence and security!
Publishing historical art since 1985

Don't Miss Any Special Deals - Sign Up To Our Newsletter!
Regimental
Prints
Original
Artwork
Postcards
Product Search         

The Royal Highland regiment, The Black Watch, shown in Military art prints, during the The Napoleonic Wars at Quatrebras and Waterloo, during the Crimea at the Battle of Alma, during the Battle of Tamai, and during the First World War, all military art prints published by Cranston fine arts The military print company

Battle of Quatrebras ] Crimean War ] Black Watch Uniform Prints ]

The Black Watch (Royal Highlander)-Regimental District No.42-are composed of the 42nd and 73rd Regiments and date from 1729, when six companies were raised for “local service.”  Originally, doubtless, care was taken to enlist none except those unfriendly to the Jacobite cause; after a time, however, this restriction was drop as regarded the rank and file, though the officers were still chosen from Whig families.  The proposal made in 1743 to send the regiment abroad gave rise to some disturbance, the Highlanders being not unnaturally keenly jealous at anything that looked like sharp practice.  But it is not our purpose to dwell upon theses earlier years of a regiment, whose historians are both numerous and enthusiastic, interesting as such early records undoubtedly are.  The disturbance was terminated, and shortly after the battle of Dettingen had been fought the Black Watch, then consisting of ten companies, joined the allied force in Flanders.  At Fontenoy they fought with such marked heroism as to be saluted by the Duke of Cumberland himself with a loud cheer in acknowledgment of their chivalrous devotion.  Their Colonel, Sir Robert Munro, seemed to bear a charmed life.  Suiting their tactics to the exigencies of their position the Highlanders, after delivering a volley, threw themselves flat on the ground while the return fire passed over them, but Sir Robert’s enormous bulk, which had necessitated his being hauled out of the trenches by his own men, rendered this manoeuvre impossible for himself to practice.  He had perforce to stand there “like an invincible Ajax, and guarding the colours of his regiment faced unmoved the enemy’s fire.”  In 1756 the Black Watch were ordered to America, and at Tisconderoga elicited unstinted praise for their valour.  In that disastrous combat they lost six hundred and fifty killed or wounded.  Others of the regiment served in 1759 at Martinique, and greatly distinguished themselves by the “characteristic impetuosity” with which they fought.  Their next service was in Canada, where they fought under General Amherst, and two years later they took part in the expedition against the Havannah.  Many of the laurels of the Black Watch have been gained in America.  In 1763 and subsequently they fought against the Indians, particularly distinguishing themselves at Bushey Run, and again in 1776 when the War of Independence gave them severe and constant work.  “In every field,” writes a chronicler of the regiment, “the Black Watch maintained their hardly earned reputation,” and numerous are the instances recorded of deeds of individual courage and readiness.  As an example may be quoted the fooling: -      “In a skirmish with the Americans in 1776 Major Murray of the 42nd, being separated from his men was attacked by three of the enemy.  His dirk had slipped behind his back, and, like Colonel Munro before referred to, being very corpulent he could not reach it.  He defended himself as well as he could with his fusil, and, watching his opportunity, seized the sword of one of his assailants and put the three to flight.”       This same Major Murray found his Falstaffian dimensions again embarrassing at fort Washington.    “The hill on which the fort stood was almost perpendicular, but the Highlanders rushed up the steep ascent like mountain cats.  When halfway up the heights they heard a melancholy voice exclaim, ‘Oh soldiers, will you leave me?’  On looking down they saw Major Murray, their commanding officer, at the foot of the precipice; his extreme obesity prevented him from following them.  They were not deaf to this appeal; it would never do to leave their corpulent commander behind.  A party leaped down at once, seized them in their arms and bore him from ledge to ledge of the rock till they reached the summit, where they drove the enemy before them and made two hundred prisoners.”

           “In a skirmish with the American rebels I 1777 Sergeant Macgregor of the 42nd was severely wounded and remained insensible on the ground.  Unlike Captain Crawley, who put on his old uniform before Waterloo, the sergeant, who seems to have been something of a dandy, had attired himself in his best as if he had been going to a ball instead of a battle.  He wore a new jacket with silver lace, large silver buckles in his shoes, and a watch of some value.  This display of wealth attracted the notice of an American soldier, who, actuated by no feeling of humanity, but by the sordid desire of stripping the sergeant at leisure, took him on his back and began to carry him, off the field.  It is probable that the American did not handle him very tenderly, and the motion soon restored him to consciousness.  He saw at once the state of matters and proved himself master of the occasion.  With one hand he drew his dirk, and grasping the American’s throat with the other he swore that he would stab him to the heart if he did not retrace his steps and bear him back in safety of the British camp.  The argumentum ad hominem in the shape of a glittering dagger before his eyes was too much for the American.  On the way to the camp Lord Cornwallis, who thanked him for his humanity; met them but he had the candour to admit the truth.  His lordship, which was much amused at the incident, gave the American his liberty, and, on Macgregor retiring from the service, procured for him a situation in the Customs at Leith.”

           In 1794 they fought in Holland, and in that terrible march through Westphalia rendered great service, especially at gildermalsen, where they scattered a regiment of French Hussars.  A Scotch officer records the fact that though the Highlanders all wore the kilt, and the men on the 42nd were principally very young soldiers, the loss they experienced from the terrible cold and privations “ was out of all comparison less than that sustained by other corps.”  The following year they again served in the West Indies, and fought with their usual courage at St. Lucia and St. Vincent, and in 1800 joined Sir Ralph Abercrombie, with whom the following year they landed in Egypt.  Here they were brigaded under Sir John Moore, and at the landing at Aboukirvied with the Welsh Fusiliers in their gallant onslaught on the French.  The story of the battle of Alexandria has too often been told, and in the telling the deeds of the black Watch enumerated, to need dwelling on here; it will suffice to say, that they undoubtedly are second to none of all the regiments that bear on their accoutrements the eloquent emblem of the Sphinx.  It was to Major Sterling of the 42nd that the standard of the “Invincible Legion” was delivered; and it was on the blanket of Donald Roy of the 42nd, that the loved general was borne away to die.

           In 1808 the Black Watch joined the army in Portugal, and were with Sir John Moore at Corunna, and a tradition, tinged with the weird superstition of the Highlands, tells that there were not wanting those in the ranks of the Black Watch who, even as their gallant commander turned to them with the conflict exhortation-“Highlander, remember Egypt!” saw rising before his manly form the prophetic, shadowy shroud which foretold his coming death.  The 2nd battalion of the regiment took part in the Walcheren expedition, while the 2nd joined the allied army in Portugal.  At Fuentes d’Onor, under Lord Blantyre, they vigorously repulsed and swept backward in disorder a formidable charge of French cavalry; at Burgos Major Dick, with the men of the Royal Highlanders under his command, were praised in dispatches for their gallantry at the assault.  They fought in the picturesque battles of the Pyrenees and Nivelle, at the Nive and Orthes.  At Toulouse General Pack, who commanded the Brigade, addressed the regiment as follows: “I have just now been with General Clinton, and he has been pleased to grant my request that in the charge which we are about to make upon the enemy’s redoubts, the 42nd regiment shall have the honour of leading on the attack.  The 42nd will advance!”  Such a regiment needed no repetition of such an order; they advanced with a magnificent charge, and the redoubt was taken, but so terrible was the fire, that “out of about five hundred men whom the 42nd brought into action, scarcely ninety reached the fatal redoubt from which the enemy had fled.”  At Quatre Bras they were subjected to a furious charge from the French Lancers, which came upon them before they could form square.  The two flank companies were ridden down, but then the highlanders formed square, and hemming the cavalry within, killed or made them prisoners.  So fierce was this brief conflict that in the space of a few minutes the command of the regiment developed upon the four officers, of whom two were killed and one severely wounded.  At Waterloo t suffices to say that they were in Picton’s division.  The two-day’s fighting cost the Black Watch in killed and wounded three hundred men. 

           Interesting though it would be to dwell on many of the occurrences of the intervening years, we must pass on to 1854, when the 42nd formed part of the famous Highland Brigade in the Crimean War.  Throughout the fascinating pages of the author of “Eothen” are numerous mentions of this splendid regiment, of which one of the earliest is the passage which tells on how that first trying march will precluded the Alma, when the troops arrived gasping and fainting with heat and thirst and weariness at their resting-place by the Buganak River, the stern discipline of Sir Colin Campbell “would not allow even the rage of thirst to loosen the high discipline of his splendid Highland regiments.  He halted them a little before they reached the stream, and so ordered it that they gained in comfort, and know that they were the gainers.”  The next day was to be known throughout the centuries as the Battles of the alma, and in the sweet, quiet fragrance of the morning air, while, though the enemy was in sight, nature seemed unready for war, and stillness pervaded the warrior-covered slopes, the quiet tones of Sir Colin were heard, remarking, “This will be a good time for the men to get loose half their cartridges.”  Before the day ended many pouches were empty, and their owners refilled them, recalling with pride “the deeds they did that day;” others were well nigh full, but the hands that so gleefully opened them in the morning, lay stiff for ever on the Russian hills.  When the time came for the Highlanders to charge, matters were looking serious.  Thistlewaite and Lindsay of the Scots Guards had saved their colours, though torn and pierced with shot.  The Guards, like wounded demi-gods, were resting, scornfully defiant, despite the terrible gaps in their ranks Twelve battalions were before the Highland Brigade, which numbered three, yet there was no thought of the possibility of failure in Campbell’s mind, as he wound up his short address to his men with the words: “Now, men, the army is watching us.  Make me proud of my Highland Brigade!”  Then the historian of the war tells us: - “Smoothly, easily, and swiftly, the Black Watch seemed to glide up the hill.  A few instants before, and their tartans ranged dark in the valley; now their plumes were on the crest.”  A few deadly volleys, and the Russians fled in sheer confusion, followed by the exulting shout of the triumphant Scots.  Neither Balaclava nor Inkerman are amongst the distinctions borne by the Black Watch, but the Comprehensive “Sevastopol” covers many a deed of heroism done during the long months that elapsed before it fell.  At the storming of the Redan, they were in reserve at the right attack, and, had it been necessary, would have shared with the Guards the renewed attack that was planned for the following morning.

           Again passing over some years, we take up the thread of the record of the 42nd in 1873, when, under Colonel MacLeod, they served in the Ashantee War.  At the battle of Amoaful in January 1874, the Black Watch were in the leading column under Alison, their own officers present being Majors Macpherson and Scott.  They soon experienced to the severe nature of the combat in which they were engaged. A correspondent wrote at the time that so hot was the fire, had the enemy used bullets instead of slugs, “scarcely a man of the Black Watch would have been left to tell the tale.”  Major Band was severely wounded, Major Macpherson was hit in several places, nine officers and nearly a hundred men were shot.  For some time the firing was heavy and seemingly confused; at last the time came for a charge.  Sir Archibald, at the head of the Black Watch, bade the pipes strike up “The Campbells are coming,” and with a dash and a cheer the regiment charged straight for the foe.  Throughout the fighting that preceded the taking of Coomassie, they were to the fore whenever fighting was to be done.  In the advance on the capital, a well-known “Man of the time”-whose opinion on daring and self possession is to be valued as coming from one who combines both qualities in so rare a manner-said, “their audacious spirit and true military bearing challenged admiration.”  “One man-Thomas Adams-exhibited himself eminently brave among brave men.”  After the town had fallen, the 42nd remained for a time as rear guard.

           Their next-and concluding campaign took place in Egypt, and it may well be imagined that we do not propose to dwell upon what is practically history of today.  They were again under the command of Sir Archibald Alison, and at Tel-el-Kebir gave evidence that they were still the same formidable “Black Watch” as of yore.  We learn from the official dispatches that the Highland Brigade was the first to reach the works, and that the fighting there was no mere child’s play is evidenced by the fact that nine of all ranks were killed and forty-one wounded or missing.  Amongst the former may be reckoned Lieutenant Graham, Sergeant-Major MacNeill, and Lieutenant Allen Park, though the last named did not succumb to his wounds on the spot.  They were engaged at El Teb and Tamai; at the latter place experiencing some very severe fighting, in which they lost, amongst others, Major Walker Aitken and Lieutenant Ronald Frader, and nearly ninety others of all ranks.  Private Edwards earned the Victoria Cross for “conspicuous bravery” in defence of a gun.  Still later on again they won the distinction of Kirbekan on their colours.

           The 2nd battalion of the Black Watch, the 73rd Regiment, dates its separate existence from 1786, when the 2nd battalion of the Black Watch was formed into distinct regiment with the number 73.  It is to the 2nd battalion that the Black Watch owes “Mangalore” and “Seringapatam.”  The defence of the former-described as one “that has been seldom equalled and never surpassed,” and “as noble an example as any in history”-might of itself be sufficient to entitle the 73rd to the epithet “distinguished.”  At this time however, they were the 2nd battalion of the 42nd.  The Europeans fit for duty were about two hundred and fifty, and there were fifteen hundred natives.  Against this handful Tippoo brought ninety thousand men, exclusive of two corps of European infantry, and one-under Lally-of Europeans and natives.  He had besides eighty pieces of cannon.  Mangalore was invested by this army about the 16th of May; for nine months Colonel Campbell and the 73rd, with the Sepoys, kept his huge host at bay; then they capitulated, but not before “the natives became so exhausted that many of them dropped down in the act of shouldering their firelocks, while others became totally blind.”  Food was exhausted; for some time the bill of fare had been dependant on frogs, dogs, crows, and similar delicacies; small wonder that even from the savage Tippoo they were granted “highly honourable terms.”  Of the 250, which the regiment numbered in May, nine officers and seventy rank and file were killed or wounded.  As the 73rd the regiment fought at Pondicherry, were in Ceylon in 1793 under General accounts of this most important battle the name of Colonels Sherbrooke and Major McDonald, with other officers of the 73rd, are referred to in most laudatory terms.  After this they were employed under the future Duke of Wellington in completing the subjection of the hostile tribes.  Returning to England in 1806, the following eight years were passed in this country and new south Wales.  A second battalion meanwhile had been formed, and under General Gibbs served in the Stralsund expedition of 1813, and was “the only British regiment present in the victory gained by Count Walmoden over the French in the plain of Gohrde, in Honover, 16th September, 1813, to which the 73rd materially contributed.”  After serving under Sir Thomas Graham, the 73rd (2nd Battalion) fought at Quatre Bras and Waterloo.

           How well they fought at Waterloo may be gathered from the fact-referred to in our notice of the 30th Regiment-that the Duke at one time during the day sent to Halkett, in whose brigade they were, to inquire which of his regiments it was that was formed in square so far in advance.  The answer revealed the actual state of the case; the square was formed of the dead warriors of the 30th and the 73rd.  “The last named regiment sustained no less than thirteen charges from Cuirassiers, and seven hours of an cannonade, and so greatly were two corps cut up, that at half past seven their colours were sent out of the field and taken to the rear.”  After Waterloo peaceful duties occupied the 73rd till the Cape War, which commenced in 1846.  They served throughout the campaign, which did not practically terminate till 1853, and to Lieutenant-Colonel Eyre of the regiment was given the command of the right wing in the operations in the Amatolas.  Space will not permit of a detailed account of the doings of the 73rd during the war, their valuable services in which consummated in the dashing attack on the fastness of the rebel chief Macomo, which, despite its seeming impregnability, was taken by storm by the regiment and their gallant companions.  Their next service was in the operations in Nepaul immediately following the suppression of the Mutiny, in which they earned great credit.  Since then their career has been unimportant, but it is interesting to note that on the resumption of their original position as the 2nd battalion of the Black Watch, they again adopted the kilt, which since 1809 has been discarded. 

The Black Watch was raised in 1739 as the 43rd Highland Regiment, in 1751 the 42nd was raised, and in 1881 both Regiments became the 1st and 2nd battalions of the Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)

Regimental Battle Honours shown on colours.

  • 1756 - 1763 Guadaloupe 1759, Martinique 1762, Havannah during the Seven Years war
  • 1763 - 1764 Pontiac's Conspiracy in North America
  • 1781 - 1783  at Mangalore during the second Mysore War
  • 1789 - 1791 Mysore during the Third Mysore War
  • 1799      Seringapatam during the fourth Mysore War
  • 1808 - 1814  Corunna, Busaco, Fuentes d'Onoro, Salamanca, Pyrenees, Nivelle, Nive, Orthes, Poulouse during .              the Peninsula war 
  • 1815,   Battle of Waterloo
  • 1846 - 1847  Seventh Kaffir War
  • 1851 - 1853  Eighth Kaffir War
  • 1854 - 1855  Alma, Sebastopol, during the Crimean War
  • 1857 - 1858  Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny
  • 1873 - 1874  Ashantee War
  • 1882 - Tel El Kibir during the Arabi Pasha Revolt
  • 1882 - 1884   First Sudan War
  • 1885 - Kirbekan, Nile during the Egyptian Campaign
  • 1914 - 1918  Marne 1914, 1918, Ypres 1914, 1917, 1918, Loos, Somme 1916, 1918, Arras 1917, 1918, Lys, Hindenburg Line, Doian 1917, Megiddo, Kut al Amara 1917
  • 1939 - 1945 Falaise Rd, Rhine , Tobruk 1941, El Alamein, Akarit, Tunis, Sicily 1943, Cassino II, Crete,  Burma 1944
  • 1950 - 1953  The Hook 1952, During the Korean War

VICTORIA CROSS AWARDS.

There has been fifteen members of the regiment who have been awarded the Victoria Cross, Eight during the Indian Mutiny, One during the Ashanti War, One during the first Sudan war, ,four during the World war One and one during the Korean War

Massive savings on this month's big offers including our BUY ONE GET ONE HALF PRICE offer on many prints and many others at HALF PRICE or with FREE PRINTS!
Many of our offers end in 4 hours, 36 minutes!
View our Special Offers

Tel El Kibir  by Alphonse de Neuville.


Tel El Kibir by Alphonse de Neuville.

The Black watch are shown clambering over a large ditch and onto the Ramparts against a 5 gun redoubt heavily defended.
Item Code : DHM0380Tel El Kibir by Alphonse de Neuville. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 32 inches x 18 inches (81cm x 46cm)none£30 Off!
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £45.00

Quantity:
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 17 inches x 12 inches (43cm x 31cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£37.00

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print. (One print reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 32 inches x 18 inches (81cm x 46cm)noneSOLD
OUT
NOT
AVAILABLE
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
The Battle of Abuklea by William Barnes Wollen.
for £62 -
Save £69

Buy With :
Black Watch Under Orders by R.G. Hutchinson.
for £60 -
Save £79


Black Watch Under Orders by R.G. Hutchinson.


Black Watch Under Orders by R.G. Hutchinson.

Showing men of the Black Watch in a barrack room in Edinburgh Castle about to leave for the war in Egypt.
Item Code : DHM0034Black Watch Under Orders by R.G. Hutchinson. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 21 inches x 14 inches (53cm x 36cm)none£35 Off!
Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £29.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
Tel El Kibir by Alphonse de Neuville.
for £60 -
Save £79


Fontenoy by Skeoch Cumming.


Fontenoy by Skeoch Cumming.

Depicting the Black Watch. An ensign is pointing out to Butcher Cumberland, who was to shed the blood of so many Highlanders on the battlefield of Culloden the following year, to take note of those slain in Englands cause.
Item Code : DHM0019Fontenoy by Skeoch Cumming. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT A restricted print run published in the late 1980s by permission of the Regimental Trustees of The Black Watch.
Full Item Details
Image size 14 inches x 9 inches (36cm x 23cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£18.00

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**A restricted print run published in the late 1980s by permission of the Regimental Trustees of The Black Watch. (One copy reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 14 inches x 9 inches (36cm x 23cm)none£13.00

Quantity:
SAVE MONEY WITH OUR DISCOUNT PRINT PACKS!

Buy With :
The Battle of Fontenoy by Felix Philippoteaux (B)
for £54 -
Save £24


Battle of Alexandria by Peter Archer.


Battle of Alexandria by Peter Archer.

Depicting the Royal Artillery along with the Gloucester regiment and Black Watch against Napoleons forces in Egypt 21st March 1801.


More Text...
Item Code : VAR0999Battle of Alexandria by Peter Archer. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT Rare edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 27 inches x 14 inches (69cm x 36cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£70.00

Quantity:


The Attack of the Black Watch, Battle of Corunna by Harry Payne.


The Attack of the Black Watch, Battle of Corunna by Harry Payne.

The Battle of Corunna, 1809: With 20,000 fighting men Sir John Moore invaded a country overrun by 300,000 veterans, and, meeting with no support from the Spaniards, struck boldly at Bonapartes communications. The audacity of this strategy drew from Napoleon that Moore was the only foe worthy of his steel. With characteristic energy Bonaparte abandoned his plan of campaign and set out in pursuit, but rumour of an alliance between Russia and Austria sent him in hot haste to Paris. Soult was left behind to drive the British into the sea. Undismayed by the overwhelming force with which he was threatened, Moore prepared to meet the French. But prudence prevailed. Madrid had capitulated without striking a blow, and the Spanish legions had melted into shadows. Moore decided to fall back upon the coast. His force was so reduced that he had to post his men on an inferior range of hills commanded by the artillery fire of the enemy. But advantage of position and superior numbers were of no avail.........


More Text...
Item Code : VAR0605The Attack of the Black Watch, Battle of Corunna by Harry Payne. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 8 inches x 12 inches (20cm x 31cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£14.00

Quantity:
ANTIQUE
CHROMOLITHOGRAPH
Original chromolithograph plate published by Raphael Tuck and Sons, 1915.Part of the Glorious Battles.
Full Item Details
Plate image size 7.5 inches x 5.5 inches (19cm x 14cm), paper size 10 inches x 7 inches (25cm x 18cm)none£58.00

Quantity:


Corporal Redpath Shooting German Snipers At Point Blank Range During The First Battle Of Ypres.


Corporal Redpath Shooting German Snipers At Point Blank Range During The First Battle Of Ypres.

When on November 11th 1914, during the first battle of Ypres, the Prussian Guard carried the first line trenches of the British at three points, the Battalion Headquarters Staff of the British suddenly found themselves between their retreating comrades and the enemy. The colonel and adjutant, with the advice of Corporal Robert Redpath, of the 1st Battalion Royal Highlanders (The Black Watch) who was attached with twenty men to Headquarters, decided to order rapid firing so as to disguise the weakness of their numbers and thus check the enemys advance. Redpath and his men therefore left their dugouts and, taking cover behind some farm buildings, opened fire on the enemy. When fifty yards off the enemy halted, but several of their snipers crept forward. With great courage Corporal Redpath came out into the open and shot dead two of the enemy who were only twenty yards away. For the gallantry and ability, which he had shown on this and a previous occasion, Corporal Redpath was award.........


More Text...
Item Code : DTE0791Corporal Redpath Shooting German Snipers At Point Blank Range During The First Battle Of Ypres. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side.
Full Item Details
Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£13.00

Quantity:


Lance Corporal Finlay leading the survivors of his bombing party towards the German trenches near the Rue Du Bois.


Lance Corporal Finlay leading the survivors of his bombing party towards the German trenches near the Rue Du Bois.

While the British artillery was shelling the German trenches near the Rue du Bois, in preparation for the advance on Sunday May 9th 1915, Lance Corporal David Finlay, of the 2nd Battalion. The Black Watch, Royal Highlanders, headed a bombing party in a gallant attempt to reach the German trenches under cover of the artillery bombardment. As the party crossed a ditch, fifteen or twenty yards from the British lines, a fierce rifle and machine gun fire broke upon them. Eight of the ten men were put out of action, two of them being shot dead in crossing over the ditch. Undismayed however. Finlay and his two surviving comrades gallantly rushed in.
Item Code : DTE0484Lance Corporal Finlay leading the survivors of his bombing party towards the German trenches near the Rue Du Bois. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINT First World War antique black and white book plate published c.1916-18 of glorious acts of heroism during the Great War. This plate may also have text on the reverse side which does not affect the framed side. Title and text describing the event beneath image as shown.
Full Item Details
Paper size 10.5 inches x 8.5 inches (27cm x 22cm)noneAdd any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!£13.00

Quantity:


Backs to the Wall by Robert Gibb.


Backs to the Wall by Robert Gibb.

This painting was inspired by Sir Douglas Haigs order to his troops at the time of the great German offensive. Note the ghostly images of the dead comrades above the soldiers heads. This was Gibbs final battle scene, painted when he was in his eighties.
Item Code : DHM0440Backs to the Wall by Robert Gibb. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 24 inches x 14 inches (61cm x 36cm)none£20 Off!
Add any two items on this offer to your basket, and the lower priced item will be half price in the checkout!Supplied with one or more free art prints!
Now : £45.00

Quantity:
PRINTOpen edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 12 inches x 8 inches (31cm x 20cm)none£5 Off!Now : £10.00

Quantity:
SPECIAL
PROMOTION
Open edition print.
Full Item Details
Image size 24 inches x 14 inches (61cm x 36cm)none£35 Off!Now : £30.00
Better Than
Half Price!

Quantity:
EX-DISPLAY
PRINT
**Open edition print. (Two copies reduced to clear)
Full Item Details
Image size 24 inches x 14 inches (61cm x 36cm)none£25 Off!Now : £40.00

Quantity:


The Black Watch by Charles Grant and Michael Youens.


The Black Watch by Charles Grant and Michael Youens.



More Text...
Item Code : MA0999The Black Watch by Charles Grant and Michael Youens. - Editions Available
TYPEDESCRIPTIONSIZESIGNATURESOFFERSPRICEPURCHASING
BOOKPaperback book.
Full Item Details
Approximately 50 pages.none£8.99

Quantity:


Contact Details
Shipping Info
Terms and Conditions
Classified Ads
Valuations

Join us on Facebook!

Sign Up To Our Newsletter!

Stay up to date with all our latest offers, deals and events as well as new releases and exclusive subscriber content!

This website is owned by Cranston Fine Arts.  Torwood House, Torwoodhill Road, Rhu, Helensburgh, Scotland, G848LE

Contact: Tel: (+44) (0) 1436 820269.  Fax: (+44) (0) 1436 820473. Email:

Follow us on Twitter!

Return to Home Page